The Next Decade of Healthcare: Robotic Assisted Surgery

The Next Decade of Healthcare: Robotic Assisted Surgery
Doctor’s Hospital in Sarasota is gaining recognition in the field through a state-of-the-art robotic suite and one of the leading robotic surgeons in the area. (Source: WWSB)

SARASOTA, Fla. (WWSB) - Local patient care is bring transformed in the operating room. Surgeons now using robots to perform minimally invasive surgeries with less recovery time for patients.

Robotic surgery didn’t enter mainstream operating rooms until 2000 when it was first approved by the FDA.

It’s become a staple of the American healthcare system with more than 2800 hospitals investing in the technology by 2017 with nearly 700,000 procedures performed.

As we enter into a new decade, these numbers are expected to grow by more than 15 percent per year.

Doctor’s Hospital in Sarasota is gaining recognition in the field through a state-of-the-art robotic suite and one of the leading robotic surgeons in the area.

It’s one of the only hospitals in the region leading the way in robotic surgery.

“The hospital itself has made a big dedication to this technology and advances as best as possible," said Doctor Robert Browning.

Doctor’s hospital of Sarasota has the only robotic suite on the Suncoast with two brand new operating rooms, specially trained O-R teams and will soon receive accreditation as a center of excellence in robotic surgery.

The general surgeon who leads the program, Dr. Browning has been performing operations for decades.

“There’s been a steady push to go for minimally invasive approaches, faster recoveries – patients want to get back to their activities faster," he said.

He knows the main goal for both patient and surgeon is getting life back to normal.

“I see that the medical community has adopted that so the robot is just one of those aspect to minimize how much disruption a medical condition can have.”

The technology is changing the way doctors save lives by providing cutting edge technology to patients on the Suncoast.

“It allows us to do very large surgeries through very small incisions," Browning went on to say.

So how does it work? It’s a question his patients frequently ask.

“Does the robot do anything independently? The answer is no," said Browning. "The robot is just a tool. I explain it as any other tool that I would use and I control the robot.”

During the procedure, Dr. Browning says he operates the robot from across the room.

It’s a combination of a surgeon’s skill with state-of-the-art technology that’s also helping cut down on the nationwide opioid epidemic.

“My patients usually don’t go home with opioids, they don’t need them, they usually just need ibuprofen, and that has a less downside as well," Browning said.

The extremely precise operations are revolutionary, but require countless hours of training.

You can expect to see the advanced care more than ever before for everything from spine, knee, abdominal or general surgery into the next decade.

“There’s lots more technology coming down the road, not just in surgery but in other parts of medicine which I think is going to continue to evolve over the next decade or so," said Browning.

Copyright 2020 WWSB. All rights reserved.