Satellites do more than show clouds

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Posted: Monday, January 20, 2014 8:42 pm | Updated: 10:00 pm, Mon Jan 20, 2014.

NOAA satellites helped save 253 people last year

EPIRB

If you plan on fishing offshore, I always stress that it's important that you have an EPRIB if you can afford one. Doing a quick google search, I found the cost for one of these life saving tools range from 350 dollars up to $600.  Well worth the cost, if ever you find yourself in a scary situation out on the water. 

Last year these beacons saved 19 people in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico from Key West to Cedar Key. EPIRB, stands for - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon. These devices have saved 1000's of lives in the United States and across the world since the early 80s. 

Here is more from NOAA.

The same NOAA satellites that helped forecasters predict severe weather, such as the Moore, Okla., tornado last May and November’s deadly Midwest tornado outbreak, also played a key role in rescuing 253 people from potentially life-threatening scenarios throughout the United States and its surrounding waters last year.

A combination of NOAA polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites detected distress signals from emergency beacons carried by downed pilots, shipwrecked boaters and stranded hikers and relayed information about their location to first responders on the ground.

NOAA satellites are part of the international Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking System, called COSPAS-SARSAT. This system uses a network of satellites to quickly detect and locate distress signals from emergency beacons onboard aircraft and boats, and from smaller, handheld personal locator beacons called PLBs.

Of the 253 rescues, 139 were waterborne rescues, 34 were from aviation incidents and 80 were from events on land, where PLBs were used. Other rescue highlights from last year include:

•Alaska had the most SARSAT rescues, with 101, followed by Florida, with 56;

•In Alaska, six passengers on a small plane were rescued after it crashed near mountainous terrain outside of Le Conte Bay, Alaska;

•Four crewmen, ejected from a B-1 bomber before it crashed, were rescued in Broadus, Mont.; and

•A boater was rescued off the coast of Kitty Hawk, N.C., after he sustained a head injury.

2013 Satellite aided rescues U.S.
Credit: NOAA

To find out more about rescues click here http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/sarsat_rescues_2013.html

SARSAT U.S. Rescues - 2013.

“Each life we save underscores the undeniable value of NOAA satellites,” said Mary Kicza, assistant administrator for NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service.

When a NOAA satellite finds the location of a distress signal, the information is relayed to the SARSAT Mission Control Center based at NOAA’s Satellite Operations Facility in Suitland, Md. From there, the information is quickly sent to a Rescue Coordination Center, operated by either the U.S. Air Force for land rescues or the U.S. Coast Guard for water rescues.

Since 1982, COSPAS-SARSAT has been credited with supporting more than 35,000 rescues worldwide, including more than 7,250 in the United States and its surrounding waters.

By law, owners of emergency beacons are required to register them with NOAA at: http://www.beaconregistration.noaa.gov. That registration information often helps provide better

and faster assistance to people in distress. It may also provide information about the location of the emergency, how many people need assistance, what type of help may be needed and other ways to contact the owner. At the end of 2013, NOAA’s registration database contained more than 400,000 registrations.

For more information about NOAA SARSAT, visit: www.sarsat.noaa.gov

Additional information about NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service can be found at: www.nesdis.noaa.gov

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and our other social media channels.

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