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Four common photography mistakes to avoid

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Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 8:00 pm

(ARA) - If your photos seem too bright, cluttered or ordinary, you can take simple steps to avoid these and other common photography mistakes.

"Photographers know it takes a good eye, practice and patience to make the most out of every moment," says Bill Robbins, an award-winning advertising photographer, commercial film director and current program chair of professional photography at Brooks Institute, a leading provider of higher education for film, graphic design, and photography. "Whether you're a professional or amateur photographer, it's also about trying new techniques and experimenting with everything from lighting to composition."

Robbins offers these tips for overcoming four common photography errors and turning any good photo into a great photo:

* No focal point. Ask yourself this simple question before you snap a picture: What are you taking a photo of and why? Your answer will ensure you capture the right elements for the viewer to easily understand the photograph's subject and purpose. Less is usually more when it comes to photo composition. For example, if you're taking a photo of a beautiful landscape, what's the main focal point - is it the rock formation, sunset or covered bridge? You may need to move in closer to fill the frame with your subject and eliminate any distractions in the background or foreground. In addition, consider turning around to see if there's a more interesting image or focal point in that direction.

* Too much or too little light. Getting the right exposure - the amount of light that passes through your camera lens - is critical to capturing the sharpest photos. If you're shooting in a dimly lit space or standing too far away from your subject, your photo may be underexposed or appear too dark. Quick fixes: Add extra light if you're indoors, move closer to your subject, or manually adjust your camera's shutter speed to be slower or the aperture to a wider lens opening, thus allowing in more light. When there's too much natural or indoor light, your photos may look washed out or have unwanted shadows. Consider using a flash to even out the lighting, moving the subject (or yourself) out of the brighter light, or waiting for a time of day when the lighting is better. For outdoor pictures, overcast days work well. When you get in the habit of focusing on the light, you'll find the best places and times to use light to your advantage.

* Centered subject. The best photos may not be perfectly centered in your frame. When eyeing any photo opportunity, consider the tried-and-true "rule of thirds." As you're framing your photo, imagine two vertical and two horizontal lines spaced evenly, creating a grid of nine rectangular boxes. Try placing the main subject near the points along these lines or where the lines intersect. This creates more visual interest than centering the subject. In a landscape shot, for example, it prevents the horizon from appearing to divide the picture in half. Instead, the horizon might appear in the lower third of the photo. You can also consider framing the image from a different position rather than always shooting at eye level. With digital cameras, it's easy to experiment and be creative with your composition.

* Red-eye. This is one of the most common - and annoying - issues with photos. Red-eye is caused by the flash reflecting off the person's retina, in which blood vessels cause the red glow. The easiest solution is to turn off the flash. You can also activate the red-eye reduction feature on many digital cameras, or, if a flash is necessary, ask the subject to avoid looking directly into the camera lens.

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