Legalization of medical marijuana discussion on the Suncoast

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Posted: Saturday, August 30, 2014 10:45 pm

MANATEE COUNTY -- (Press Release) Should Florida legalize medical marijuana?  The League of Women Voters of Manatee County will present speakers and discussion on this issue on Monday, September 15, from 11:30 am to 1 pm.

Proposed ballot Amendment no. 2 would permit the regulated dispensation of marijuana for medical conditions. The issue will require a 60% approval vote of the citizens. Those in favor say it is medically necessary to treat symptoms and pain. Those opposed say getting medical marijuana will be too easy, and the amendment will lead to abuse. Speaking in favor of the amendment will be Vanessa Moffatt of United for Care; in opposition will be Dr. Jessica Spencer of Vote No on Two.

The free program will take place at the Bradenton Woman's Club, 1705 Manatee Ave. West.  Doors open at 11:30 am for a light lunch; the speakers program begins at noon. For more information, call 729-9248.

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Welcome to the discussion.

6 comments:

  • wm97 posted at 11:23 am on Mon, Sep 1, 2014.

    wm97 Posts: 3

    More people have died from overdoses of aspirin and water than have died from overdoses of cannabis.

    See "What is the lethal dose of marijuana?" at www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/mj_overdose.htm

    According to which US Government authority you want to believe, the lethal dose of marijuana is either about one-third your body weight, or about 1,500 pounds, consumed in fifteen minutes.

    NSAIDs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, cause about 7,600 deaths from overdose every year. About 100 people die every year from overdoses of water. That is, drinking too much water, not drowning. There has never been a recorded human overdose death from marijuana.

     
  • wm97 posted at 6:37 pm on Sun, Aug 31, 2014.

    wm97 Posts: 3

    Marijuana was outlawed for two major reasons. The first was because "All Mexicans are crazy and marijuana is what makes them crazy. The second was the fear that heroin addiction would lead to the use of marijuana - exactly the opposite of the modern "gateway" nonsense.

    Only one MD testified at the hearings for the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937. The representative of the American Medical Association said there was no evidence that marijuana was a dangerous drug and no reason for the law. He pointed out that it was used in hundreds of common medicines at the time, with no significant problems. In response, the committee told him that, if he wasn't going to cooperate, he should shut up and leave.

    The only other "expert" to testify was James C. Munch, a psychologist. His sole claim to fame was that he had injected marijuana directly into the brains of 300 dogs and two of them died. When they asked him what he concluded from this, he said he didn't know what to conclude because he wasn't a dog psychologist. Mr. Munch also testified in court, under oath, that marijuana could make your fangs grow six inches long and drip with blood. He also said that, when he tried it, it turned him into a bat. He then described how he flew around the room for two hours.

    Mr. Munch was the only "expert" in the US who thought marijuana should be illegal, so they appointed him US Official Expert on marijuana, where he served and guided policy for 25 years.

    If you read the transcripts of the hearings, one question is asked more than any other: "What is this stuff?" It is quite apparent that Congress didn't even know what they were voting on. The law was shoved through by a small group of lunatics with no real awareness by anyone else of what was happening.

    See http://druglibrary.org/schaffer/History/whiteb1.htm for an entertaining short history of the marijuana laws.
    See http://druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/taxact/taxact.htm for the complete transcripts of the hearings for the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937.

     
  • wm97 posted at 6:36 pm on Sun, Aug 31, 2014.

    wm97 Posts: 3

    The question of what to do about drugs is not a new one. Over the last 100 years there have been numerous major government commissions around the world that have studied the drug laws and made recommendations for changes. You can find the full text of all of them at http://druglibrary.org/schaffer under Major Studies of Drugs and Drug Policy.

    They all reached remarkably similar conclusions, no matter who did them, or where, or when, or why. They all agreed that the current laws were based on ignorance and nonsense, and that the current policy does more harm than good, no matter what you assume about the dangers of drugs. You don't have to take my word for that. Read them yourself.

    If you are new to the collection, start with Licit and Illicit Drugs at http://druglibrary.org/schaffer/Library/studies/cu/cumenu.htm That is the best overall review of the drug problem ever written. If you only read one book on the subject, make it that one. It will give you a good summary of what you would learn if you read all the other major reports.

    In 1973, President Nixon's US National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse completed the largest study of the drug laws ever done. At the end of their study, they said the real drug problem was not marijuana, or heroin, or cocaine. The real drug problem, they said, was the ignorance of our public officials who keep spouting off with solutions but have never read the most basic research on the subject.

    In a perfect illustration of their point, Nixon refused to read his own commission's report. The full text can be found at http://druglibrary.org/schaffer/Library/studies/nc/ncmenu.htm

     
  • Boots posted at 3:52 pm on Sun, Aug 31, 2014.

    Boots Posts: 1

    Is it true that over the coarse of history more people have died from aspirin than cannabis? Yes or No.

     
  • HempStaff posted at 3:48 pm on Sun, Aug 31, 2014.

    HempStaff Posts: 14

    Vote Yes on #2! We can do this Florida!

     
  • Brian Kelly posted at 1:19 pm on Sun, Aug 31, 2014.

    Brian Kelly Posts: 5

    When a loved one is in pain, wasting away unable to eat, and needs this marvelous herb in order to increase their appetite, reduce the overwhelming pain, and live as as healthy and happily as they can with the time they have left, let's have the compassion to allow them to have it.

    Stop treating Medical Marijuana Patients like second rate citizens and common criminals by forcing them to the dangerous black market for their medicine.

    Risking incarceration to obtain the medicine you need is no way to be forced to live.

    Support Medical Marijuana Now!

    "[A] federal policy that prohibits physicians from alleviating suffering by prescribing marijuana for seriously ill patients is misguided, heavy-handed, and inhumane." — Dr. Jerome Kassirer, "Federal Foolishness and Marijuana," editorial, New England Journal of Medicine, January 30, 1997

    "[The AAFP accepts the use of medical marijuana] under medical supervision and control for specific medical indications." — American Academy of Family Physicians, 1989, reaffirmed in 2001

    "[We] recommend … allow[ing] [marijuana] prescription where medically appropriate." — National Association for Public Health Policy, November 15, 1998

    "Therefore be it resolved that the American Nurses Association will: — Support the right of patients to have safe access to therapeutic marijuana/cannabis under appropriate prescriber supervision." — American Nurses Association, resolution, 2003

    "The National Nurses Society on Addictions urges the federal government to remove marijuana from the Schedule I category immediately, and make it available for physicians to prescribe. NNSA urges the American Nurses' Association and other health care professional organizations to support patient access to this medicine." — National Nurses Society on Addictions, May 1, 1995

    "[M]arijuana has an extremely wide acute margin of safety for use under medical supervision and cannot cause lethal reactions … [G]reater harm is caused by the legal consequences of its prohibition than possible risks of medicinal use." — American Public Health Association, Resolution #9513, "Access to Therapeutic Marijuana/Cannabis," 1995

    "When appropriately prescribed and monitored, marijuana/cannabis can provide immeasurable benefits for the health and well-being of our patients … We support state and federal legislation not only to remove criminal penalties associated with medical marijuana, but further to exclude marijuana/cannabis from classification as a Schedule I drug." — American Academy of HIV Medicine, letter to New York Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, November 11, 2003

     

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