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New long-term study finds skipping breakfast can have men's hearts skipping beats

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Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 4:41 pm | Updated: 5:51 pm, Tue Jul 23, 2013.

If you don't like to eat breakfast you may want to reconsider.

a long-term study finds that men who didn't eat breakfast had a twenty seven percent higher risk of cardiac disease, particularly cardiac death.

This new research conducted in the Journal Circulation involved twenty seven thousand men age forty-five and older who were followed for sixteen years.

Dr. Martin Frey of the Sarasota Heart Center said, "If you fast for a long time overnight your hormonal structure when you wake up is very different, meaning that your levels of insulin are high, your levels of cortisol are high"

He added that this is what happens when you skip breakfast and don't eat for a long time. "More than likely the next time you go to eat you're going to the food will go into fat stores, increase your cholesterol, increase your sugar content and all those then secondarily over time will lead to heart disease."

And, having a big meal later in the day wont make up for the missing morning meal.

"If you don't eat a proper breakfast and then you go later on and eat a fabulous lunch," Said Bonni London of London Wellness, "Your blood sugar does not come back later on in the afternoon"

Both Frey and London say the choice you make in the morning is critical to your health, and adding breakfast to your daily meals doesn't have to be complicated and may reduce your risk of heart disease.

"The number one thing that we need to eat is protein at breakfast, " Said London, "I recommend to aim for about twenty to thirty grams. Which is about, like if you get a Greek yogurt for example,"

Dr. Frey added, "It can be some hard boiled eggs you made the night before, some oatmeal, or some toast"

So here's food for though when thinking of skipping that first meal, the risk of heart disease is increased by having high cholesterol and insulin levels much the same way as if we had eaten poorly all along.

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